Why this brain-scanning device is the best thing since sliced bread

Why this brain-scanning device is the best thing since sliced bread

It’s the brain-stopping device that has revolutionised our lives.

It’s also been used in a legal case where the defence has argued the device’s use of EEG technology, which can measure brain activity, violates human rights.

The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard arguments in a case involving a man who had been diagnosed with a brain tumour.

The court is hearing arguments in the case involving the Supreme Court, which is currently deliberating whether to grant the right to use brain scans to prove innocence.

In its order, the court said the Supreme Courts authority to make such decisions “is limited to the conduct of the court”.

The court said: “The court cannot interfere in the conduct or decisions of the courts or of the government.”

The case centres on a man, Prakash Singh, who was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2015.

Prakasam Singh, a father of four from Gwalior in Uttar Pradesh, is suing the state government for the use of the EEG device to prove his innocence.

He alleges that the government is using the device to target people who are suspected of having committed crimes against the state.

The Supreme Court in December ordered the Centre to grant permission to the state for the devices use.

“The court has found the use and disclosure of information about the use, the availability of the technology and the nature of the information necessary to make an informed decision about the matter and that the disclosure of such information does not amount to a violation of the privacy or personal liberty of the individual,” the court’s order said.

“Therefore, the disclosure is permissible and cannot be prohibited.”

A spokesman for the Centre said the government would “vigorously defend” the decision.

According to the Supreme Constitution, the Centre is empowered to make decisions on a range of matters relating to the constitution, law, justice, health and family affairs.

Prakash’s lawyer, Deepak Jain, told NDTV he had argued the use was not permissible and the case should be referred to the apex court.

In November, the Supreme court said it was not “appropriate” to ban EEGs and that people should have the right “to seek the help of the experts and counsel” in the use.

“The decision is a fundamental one.

The privacy of the citizen is a personal one.

But the privacy of any person should not be taken for granted,” Justice Rajiv Pratap Singh wrote in the order.

However, in its order Tuesday, the apex bench said the court cannot “interfere in the decision of the relevant government agency”.

“We have no jurisdiction to interfere with the decisions of any government agency in the exercise of its function.

The power of the Centre under Article 14 (3) of the Constitution does not extend to any law or regulation of the states or Union Territories,” the order said, adding that the court should “not interfere” in state decisions.

admin

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