‘Weird’ water samples found at Nova Scotia’s largest landfill

‘Weird’ water samples found at Nova Scotia’s largest landfill

The National Post is reporting that a team of researchers from Nova Scotia have found the remains of what appears to be an ancient aquatic life.

The findings were published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin, but the researchers said that they didn’t know why they found the evidence of a marine environment in a landfill in Labrador.

“What we’re finding is that some of the things that we’ve found here, the soil, the vegetation, there’s some organic material that’s been buried in there for millions of years,” lead researcher Ian Bouchard said in a statement.

“It’s just sort of weird to see something like that in this landfill.”

The team found the buried soil in 2013, when they were collecting samples from the Nova Scotia landfill at Lake Erie, near the city of Halifax.

“We’re finding this sedimentary material that we’re supposed to be dealing with as we’re digging up the soil and trying to get at the roots of this,” said University of New Brunswick marine ecologist and lead author of the study, Andrew Smith.

Bouchards team said that a sedimentary layer of soil had been found in the landfill and that it contained several organisms including micro-organisms.

The group said that these micro-organisms would be more likely to survive if they were in the soil layer than they would in the air. “

But there’s also evidence of water and that water’s not necessarily the same kind of water that you might expect to find in a landfill.”

The group said that these micro-organisms would be more likely to survive if they were in the soil layer than they would in the air.

They added that it would be very unusual for any living organism to have been in a decomposing landfill at that point in time.

“A lot of these organisms have no idea that they’re in the ground,” said Smith.

Bouchar said that he and his team have been conducting research on the soil of Lake Erie since 2013, and that he believes the samples they’ve collected have helped scientists understand how the marine environment could have formed in the first place. “

If you put it in the sea, the ocean will take care of it.”

Bouchar said that he and his team have been conducting research on the soil of Lake Erie since 2013, and that he believes the samples they’ve collected have helped scientists understand how the marine environment could have formed in the first place.

He said that if the team’s findings are true, the landfill could be the site of a prehistoric life-giving ecosystem that had been buried there for millennia.

“When you think about how deep that system goes, you think of the sea floor, and it’s the same place where there’s a whole system of sedimentary layers,” said Bouchars study co-author, University of British Columbia marine ecophysicist Paul Bouchault.

“I think that this is an important site for us to continue our research.”

Boulton said that the team plans to use a new technology to determine the exact amount of micro-fungi that were found in Lake Erie soil, but they are still searching for the micro-pathogens.

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